Discipline, initiative, and responsibility are all skills you would expect a young person to learn in the military. But what about teamwork and learning to successfully collaborate with others as a whole greater than its parts? For Hugh Campbell, his time in the US Army taught him this invaluable lesson.

When Campbell entered West Point fresh out of high school, he never dreamed of the opportunities that would soon be accessible to him. Through his work as a communications officer, Campbell learned invaluable lessons about leadership, problem-solving, and tech. After leaving the military and joining the private sector, Campbell put to work the skills that he had honed, which led directly to his many successes and a career as an “accidental entrepreneur.”

Campbell currently serves as President of AC4S Technologies, a hybrid cloud solutions provider. Prior to his current position, he served as CEO of AC4S for 16 years. Before that, he held positions in planning, designing, and implementing large-scale telecommunications networks for companies like Intermedia Communications and Accelacom. He also serves as Chairman of the Board for the CEO Council of Tampa Bay and as a member of the board of trustees for BayCare Health System.

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Some Questions Asked: 

  • Where did you grow up and how did you end up at West Point? (04:07)
  • Where did you go after you left the military? (07:10)
  • How did West Point and the military prepare you for being an entrepreneur? (11:21)
  • How can people like me invest more in minority founders? (18:25)

In this episode, you will learn:

  • About AC4S Technologies and where the name came from. (02:25)
  • How Campbell became what he calls an “accidental entrepreneur.” (08:21)
  • The advice Campbell has for young, hungry founders who are just starting out and why it’s so important to make sure you’re really vetting the partners you’re going into business with. (12:34)
  • Why being an entrepreneur isn’t for the faint of heart and easily discouraged—and why it’s best to play the game as a team sport. (15:22)

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